how sugar ages skin

how sugar ages skin

how sugar ages skin

As we ingest sugar (or any high-glycemic carbohydrates like bread, starches, soda) a chemical reaction takes place. It is called glycation and it plays a number on collagen and elastin proteins whose presence means smooth, plump, youthful skin. Furthermore, the very glucose that provides energy for our cells to function can react with those very proteins resulting in the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, or AGEs.

Yes, AGEs, it’s a thing, no pun intended here, hear me out.

AGEs contribute to actual loss of elasticity and changes in the dermis associated with the aging process.

more than skin deep

Presence of too much sugar in blood of a fasting patient, or hyperglycemia has been linked to diseases such as diabetes, cataract, Alzheimer’s, dialysis related amyloidosis (DRA), atherosclerosis and Parkinson’s as well as physiological aging. As you can see, all of the diseases listed are degenerative diseases that have been shown to also be caused by inflammation linked to an individual’s diet.

So, less sugar = less AGEs formation = less inflammation = less disease

slow down, just a bit

The truth is, Even at normal glucose levels, some degree of glycation occurs and the damage caused thereby accumulates slowly over time. So, we will all age, ladies, but we can control at what speed. Scientists now believe that reducing glycation is a means of slowing the aging process and disease formation. There is even laboratory evidence that shows prolonged lifespan in experimental animals with calorie restriction diets (sorry, my fellow animal lovers, I wish I could say no furry friends were tested on…). To conclude, cutting down on some calories that end up as glucose in your blood may be key to maintaining your complexion as young as it is right this very moment, as you finish reading this piece. I’m in.

With love and care, 

 

Svetlana

 

References:

Glucose, glycation and aging. BIOGERONTOLOGY · FEBRUARY 2004 Impact Factor: 3.01 · DOI:10.1007/s10522-004-3189-0 · Source: PubMed



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